Southeast Manufacturing News January 2014 : Page 44

Applying Technology Automation • Machines • Spindles • Tooling • Software • Workholding 3D Printing for Workholding Manufacturing as well as help in the estimating of other CNC machining oppor-tunities. The printer, a Stratasys Dimension 1200ES, has the capa-bility of running parts with a 10” x 10” x 12” envelope in an ABS plastic substrate. 3D printing is a form of additive manu-facturing, in which ma-terial is built up, one layer at a time, to create a 3D solid working model from a CAD file. It is referenced as addi-tive manufacturing to distinguish it from the subtractive process of traditional machining, in which material is removed from the sur-face of a blank work-p i e c e . J a m e s To o l engineers believe this technology is substan-With the purchase of a Stratasys Dimension 1200ES, tially changing the way James Tool has incorporated 3D printing technology the company can serve into the engineer and build phases of workholding its customers. devices and other products. The process involves the “We were up and incremental build-up of ABS plastic material to produce a running parts within representative part used for production evaluation, sales presentations and possible engineering modifications. two hours after the in-stallation and set-up,” James Tool engineers and manu-said Toner. “This included the initial factures a wide variety of hydraulic calibration on the machine and train-workholding devices used in aero-ing from the local technician. Since we space, automotive and other high-pre-utilized 3D imaging in our CAD de-cision industries. Because of the signs for over 15 years, the transition continuous custom work, the company to 3D printing was practically seam-keeps abreast of technological devel-less. The 3D printing image gives our opments in the engineering and pro-engineers a cleaner concept and duction of its products. To that end, enables a much more robust design James Tool recently installed a 3D process, as we can see clamping tabs, printer in its Engineer & Build Hy-locating pins and the entire work en-draulic Workholding Division. velope more clearly. This results in an “We started seeing 3D printing easy-to-use, cost effective tool, plus we make an impact some years ago,” said have significantly shorter times for Jeff Toner, President of James Tool. “We quote and order-to-first part sequenc-waited until the technology had ing. 3D printing has already reduced evolved and become more affordable engineering and quoting time substan-before making our initial investment.” tially for workholding fixtures and The first machine was purchased early CNC production jobs.” James Tool 2013 and is currently used to support runs roughly an equivalent amount of work in produc-the company’s workholding division, tion and one-off or short run jobs. “While the in-teraction between James Tool and its customers has not changed substan-tially, it is quite helpful to have an actual part gener-ated through the 3D printing process before engineering and quoting be-g i n , ” s a i d Ti m King, James Tool Vice President and Examples of 3D printed prototypes created on the Stratasys machine directly from the CAD files. Cont’d on Page 46 44 January 2014 • SOUTHEAST MANUFACTURING NEWS • www.mfgnewsweb.com Automation Simplifies Large Part Handling After op 50 has been completed, the FANUC M900 (pictured) moves the workpiece to the smaller deburring-dedicated M10 robot. Once both sides have been deburred, the M900 will rotate the part to the high-pressure cabinet (left) for washing. Stecker Machine Co., Inc. was in search of a solution for machining, de-burring and washing a large casting weighing almost 200 lbs. The part, a large front engine cover for a diesel en-gine, required a highly accurate and heavy-duty machine to remove metal and hold precise tolerances. The size and weight of the part made handling by an operator difficult and time con-suming. Stecker’s list of requirements for the task included: • Ergonomic considerations to elimi-nate the risk of injury to employees • Minimize output variation that can often result from manual handling of large parts • Develop a deburring system that will be automated and consistent to meet customer specifications and keep the operator available for maintaining other areas of the cell Continued on Page 47 Serving a Diverse Customer Base The Fermat WFT13 is a rigid, heavy-duty CNC horizontal boring mill. A to Z Machine Co. uses it to machine large parts of various sizes and materials. A to Z Machine Co. was challenged with increasing its current capacity to better serve a diverse and growing cus-tomer base. Criteria for a machine se-lection included a large work envelope machining capacity maintaining high levels of accuracy. “We began our search with visiting area manufacturers that are utilizing various boring mills,” said Dave Reiter, Partner, A to Z Machine Co. “After comparing machine specifications and options that met our criteria, we con-cluded that the Fermat WFT13 CNC horizontal boring mill was the most ac-curate, heavy-duty and versatile ma-chine at the best price. Continued on Pager 49

3D Printing For Workholding Manufacturing

James Tool engineers and manufactures a wide variety of hydraulic workholding devices used in aerospace, automotive and other high-precision industries. Because of the continuous custom work, the company keeps abreast of technological developments in the engineering and production of its products. To that end, James Tool recently installed a 3D printer in its Engineer & Build Hydraulic Workholding Division.<br /> <br /> "We started seeing 3D printing make an impact some years ago," said Jeff Toner, President of James Tool. "We waited until the technology had evolved and become more affordable before making our initial investment." The first machine was purchased early 2013 and is currently used to support the company's workholding division, as well as help in the estimating of other CNC machining opportunities. The printer, a Stratasys Dimension 1200ES, has the capability of running parts with a 10" x 10" x 12" envelope in an ABS plastic substrate.<br /> <br /> 3D printing is a form of additive manufacturing, in which material is built up, one layer at a time, to create a 3D solid working model from a CAD file. It is referenced as additive manufacturing to distinguish it from the subtractive process of traditional machining, in which material is removed from the surface of a blank workpiece . James Tool engineers believe this technology is substantially changing the way the company can serve its customers.<br /> <br /> "We were up and running parts within two hours after the installation and set-up," said Toner. "This included the initial calibration on the machine and training from the local technician. Since we utilized 3D imaging in our CAD designs for over 15 years, the transition to 3D printing was practically seamless. The 3D printing image gives our engineers a cleaner concept and enables a much more robust design process, as we can see clamping tabs, locating pins and the entire work envelope more clearly. This results in an easy-to-use, cost effective tool, plus we have significantly shorter times for quote and order-to-first part sequencing. 3D printing has already reduced engineering and quoting time substantially for workholding fixtures and CNC production jobs." James Tool runs roughly an equivalent amount of work in production and one-off or short run jobs.<br /> <br /> "While the interaction between James Tool and its customers has not changed substantially, it is quite helpful to have an actual part generated through the 3D printing process before engineering and quoting begin," said Tim King, James Tool Vice President and general Manager. "When you can go into a meeting with an actual part in hand, it can help in many ways. We or the customer can often see desirable changes that might make the component function more effectively, be easier to machine or both. We have already secured our first customer orders by using this system, and the results have exceeded expectations."<br /> <br /> "We do not always get a part to study when quoting custom hydraulic workholding. We do almost always get a 3D digital model," said Toner. "Having a part in hand while brainstorming a fixture concept is invaluable. We quote many production CNC opportunities. Having a representative part in hand has allowed us to see features that require special tools or additional processes. It is a time saver.<br /> <br /> "I anticipate that, in the future, actual production parts will be printed rather than machined using conventional methods on a large number of the jobs we handle. The future of 3D manufacturing is really limitless. Anyone can now order a desktop 3D printer for his or her business or home office and, once they master the system, have a 3D prototype part in less than a few hours. I anticipate this technology will revolutionize manufacturing and create a new breed of entrepreneurs in our industry. As additive manufacturing grows and becomes more cost effective to manufacture production parts, we want to be very familiar and poised to enter the production additive manufacturing arena."<br /> <br /> In its ongoing effort to maintain a quality workforce, the company maintains a full training facility on its Morganton, NC, campus, which has recently expanded to house more machining, finishing, quality lab and large workpiece handling equipment. James Tool actively trains many of its employees in cross-functional machining operations in order to make the company more flexible and capable for its customers.<br /> <br /> James Tool provides quality precision machining services in three primary areas:<br /> <br /> • CNC production machining<br /> <br /> • CNC non-production machining<br /> <br /> • Engineering and building of hydraulic workholding devices.<br /> <br /> "The ultimate goal of all our efforts and teamwork is to meet customer requirements through our commitment to continual improvement," said Toner.<br /> <br /> James Tool was founded in 1987 by James "Bud" Toner. Jeff Toner has been in the manufacturing business for over 30 years. James Tool customers include major OEMs and suppliers to aerospace, automotive, off-highway, energy, nuclear and transportation industries.<br /> <br /> For more information<br /> contact:<br /> Kevin Moses<br /> Jeff Toner<br /> James Tool Machine<br /> & Engineering, Inc.<br /> 130 Reep Drive<br /> Morganton, NC 28655<br /> 828-584-8722<br /> sales@jamestool.com<br /> www.jamestool.com<br /> <br /> Stratasys, Inc.<br /> 7665 Commerce Way<br /> Eden Prairie, MN 55344<br /> 800-937-3010 / 952-937-3000<br /> info@stratasys.com<br /> www.stratasys.com

Automation Simplifies Large Part Handling

Stecker Machine Co., Inc. was in search of a solution for machining, deburring and washing a large casting weighing almost 200 lbs. The part, a large front engine cover for a diesel engine, required a highly accurate and heavy-duty machine to remove metal and hold precise tolerances. The size and weight of the part made handling by an operator difficult and time consuming.<br /> <br /> Stecker's list of requirements for the task included:<br /> <br /> • Ergonomic considerations to eliminate the risk of injury to employees<br /> <br /> • Minimize output variation that can often result from manual handling of large parts<br /> <br /> • Develop a deburring system that will be automated and consistent to meet customer specifications and keep the operator available for maintaining other areas of the cell • Develop the most cost effective production solution to meet customer requirements and allow for fluctuations that may exceed initial projections<br /> <br /> • Identify a parts washing solution that would remove all debris after machining to provide consistently clean parts.<br /> <br /> It was determined early in the project that new equipment would be required and that a robotic solution would be the best fit. The 800 mm- and 630 mm-sized horizontal machining centers (HMCs) were both considered for machining. The solution selected was two new Toyoda FH630SXs with 8,000 RPM, 50 HP high-torque (744 ftlb) spindles, which would allow heavyduty metal removal and high accuracies. With the large envelope of the FH630SX, Stecker was able to fit the part into the machine without moving up to an 800 mm-sized machine.<br /> <br /> "Since the parts could be processed in a 630 mm machine, it lowered the equipment cost and increased the output potential," said Joel Kaeppler, Vice President, Stecker Machine Co. "A separate, smaller robot for the deburring of parts was included so the main robot would not be interrupted by a long deburring cycle - possibly holding up other resources in the cell. A custom washer was developed by Renegade to focus directly on holes that would not be properly addressed with a conventional spray washer. This addressed the problem we had on previous parts with contamination in small blind holes. An inspection conveyor was used to allow the operator to review the parts after machining, and prior to pressure testing and final packaging."<br /> <br /> State Machine Tool, Inc., Toyoda's Wisconsin distributor, designed and integrated a robot cell with the machining centers using a FANUC M900 robot with vision to manipulate the parts through the cell and a FANUC M10 robot for the deburring of parts. The FANUC M-900iA/260L robot was selected for its 10' reach and 575 lb. Pay load capacity. This allowed the robot to reach all operations, from removing and verifying parts from the raw packaging, through the machining process, deburring robot and wash, and finally through the inspection and pressure test operation.<br /> <br /> Cell operation begins when parts are dropped off via forklift in stacks of five, separated by plywood. The heart of the cell, the FANUC M900 robot, uses a vacuum pad to move the plywood to a shelving unit. It then uses the FANUC vision system, which State Machine adapted to be able to identify black painted parts, to verify the identity of the raw part. After verifying the workpiece, the M900 robot loads the part into the machines. The first machine does ops 10,30 and 50, while the other machine does ops 20 and 40. This breakdown of operations was done to balance cycle times between machines and to optimize output. Transition stands are used between machines to hold the parts until the next operation is available for loading. To accommodate loading and unloading on both sides of the pallet for ops 10 and 50, State Machine programmed the robot to rotate pallet A180°.<br /> <br /> The HMCs use a laser eye for efficient broken tool detection during production to minimize the risk of multiple defective parts in the event of a tool failure. After machining is complete, the robot moves the machined part to a deburring station equipped with the FANUC M10. This smaller robot deburrs side one, then the M900 robot flips the part over and the other side is deburred.<br /> <br /> The robot then places the deburred part into a high-pressure cabinet. This customized cabinet was designed and built by Renegade, based on input from Stecker Machine, to address all areas of concern. After the washing is complete, the robot moves it to a conveyor belt, where the part is inspected by the operator for bore sizes, critical dimensions and foundry defects. When the part passes inspection, it is reintroduced into the cell and the robot moves the part to the leak tester, which pressurizes the inside of the part for the decay test. If the part fails, it is returned to the operator on the inspection conveyor for further evaluation. If there is no visual evidence of the cause for the leak, it is retested. Otherwise, it is removed from the cell and quarantined for the defect. Parts that pass the leak test are moved to the final packaging for shipment to the customer. The robot will properly orient the part, as well as manipulate the dedicated packaging used between parts to prevent shipping damage.<br /> <br /> The entire automation cell is run by a single operator who inspects the quality of the part and maintains tooling is performing as it should. The cell runs two parts per hour and has the capability of running two different part numbers with virtually zero downtime to switch between part numbers. Since implementation, Stecker Machine has noticed that it is scrapping fewer parts and getting more output because of increased consistency in loading and handling of parts, deburring and parts washing.<br /> <br /> "As mentioned, this cell is used for precision machining of a large front engine cover for a diesel engine," said Kaeppler. "The output improved by about 25% compared to the larger machines that were used prior to moving into the cell. In addition, the finished product is more consistent due to the part-specific washer and automated deburring."<br /> <br /> As for future automation plans, Stecker Machine is looking to continue to utilize robotic cells for high-production jobs or those that require material handling of large parts.<br /> <br /> Stecker Machine's philosophy is "Solutions for Manufacturing Challenges." "Stecker works with customers to determine the best and most cost-effective way to address the opportunities that they bring to us," said Kaeppler. "This is accomplished by how we train our employees and giving them the opportunity to provide input, as well as collaborating with suppliers to determine the best solution for a given manufacturing challenge. These resources enable Stecker to react more quickly than other similar suppliers due to our flexibility to assign internal resources to meet the manufacturing challenges of our customers."<br /> <br /> Gerald Stecker, a journeyman tool and die maker, started his tool and die business out of his garage with his brother in 1973. They began precision CNC production machining in 1989. Today, the company features a diverse range of CNC machines to meet a wide range of customer requirements. These machines include various sizes of horizontal and vertical machining centers, as well as turning centers. Stecker utilizes robotic technology for part loading, deburring and packaging on several different parts throughout the plant. The company is most competitive on jobs with annual quantities of 1,000 to 100,000. However, prototypes and service volumes are well within the company's capabilities when they are related to production jobs. The shop can machine most ferrous and non-ferrous materials in cast, extruded, plate and bar form, including cast iron, cast aluminum-die, cast, permanent mold, sand cast, austempered ductile iron and cast steel. Value-added services include pressure testing, sub-assemblies, assembly and welding services. Subcontractor relationships have been established to provide other complementary services such as heat treating, painting and coatings that are applied to the castings that are machined.<br /> <br /> Stecker Machine's quality department provides exceptional production support, including clear and concise documentation and instructions meeting TS16949 standards, CMM inspection, millipore cleanliness testing, high-accuracy custom gaging, hardness testing, surface finish testing and roundness testing. "We are committed to providing a superior product that meets or exceeds customer expectations," said Kaeppler. "The in-house design and fixture build team provide designs and tooling with short lead times to meet the customers' specifications. Our staff uses the latest modeling, fixture design and CNC software along with constant reinvestment into new technology to remain a leader in the machining industry."<br /> <br /> For more information contact:<br /> Joel Kaeppler, Vice President<br /> Stecker Machine Co., Inc.<br /> 5107 County Road C<br /> Manitowoc, WI54220<br /> 920-726-4526<br /> joel.kaeppler@steckermachine.com<br /> www.steckermachine.com<br /> <br /> Toyoda Machinery USA<br /> 316 W. University Dr.<br /> Arlington Heights, IL 60004<br /> 847-253-0340<br /> info@toyoda.com<br /> www.toyoda.com

Serving A Diverse Customer Base

A to Z Machine Co. Was challenged with increasing its current capacity to better serve a diverse and growing customer base. Criteria for a machine selection included a large work envelope machining capacity maintaining high levels of accuracy.<br /> <br /> "We began our search with visiting area manufacturers that are utilizing various boring mills," said Dave Reiter, Partner, A to Z Machine Co. "After comparing machine specifications and options that met our criteria, we concluded that the Fermat WFT13 CNC horizontal boring mill was the most accurate, heavy-duty and versatile machine at the best price. "Service and support was another major factor in our decision to purchase the Fermat. EURO Machinery Specialists, Fermat's representative in Wisconsin, has a great staff of mechanical and electrical service engineers with many years of expertise in service, rebuilding and retrofitting all types of machinery. The comfort level we had with EURO, combined with everything we saw and learned about the Fermat, made it a very clear choice."<br /> <br /> Almost all of A to Z's machinery has a different control than the new Fermat machine. After A to Z's company personnel visited a user of a Fermat boring mill that had a Heidenhain iTNC530 control, the decision was made to have the new machine installed with a Heidenhain. "After a minor learning curve the Heidenhain has really proven to be an ideal CNC for shops like us - job shop one-off part runs on the larger workpieces," said Reiter.<br /> <br /> Features of the Fermat WFT13 CNC horizontal boring mill include:<br /> <br /> • 5.1" spindle diameter, CAT 50, 3,100 RPM<br /> <br /> • 75 HP<br /> <br /> • 157" x 98" x 67" XYZ travels<br /> <br /> • 29" W travel (spindle)<br /> <br /> • 79" x 95" 20 ton full fourth axis rotary table<br /> <br /> • 300 PSI coolant through spindle<br /> <br /> • 90° milling head / 3,000 RPM<br /> <br /> • Spindle support sleeve<br /> <br /> • Heidenhain iTNC 530 CNC control.<br /> <br /> The machine is used to machine large parts of various sizes and materials. "We are pleased with our Fermat," said Reiter. "It has proven to be all we thought it would be. The machine produces good surface finishes due to its rigidity and heavy-duty design. The rigidity allows us in some cases to take greater depths of cut. The accuracy has been very good as well. The size capability allows us to machine parts larger than we could have in the past. We would certainly purchase another Fermat in the future."<br /> <br /> A to Z's 95,000 sq. ft. Facility features 39 CNC machines ranging from 16" x 20" vertical machining centers (VMCs) up to a 98" x 160" Yama Seiki AWEA bridge-type VMC and 10" chuck horizontal lathes up to its largest Doosan CNC horizontal turning center with 32" chuck, 200" between centers. Horizontal capacity ranges from 19" square pallet machining centers up to its Fermat boring mill with 157" x 98" capacity. A to Z uses the latest Gibbs, Solidworks, Autocad and E2 shoptech software. The company also has a 2,500 sq. ft. Weld shop and is ISO 9001/2008 certified.<br /> <br /> A to Z's goal is to continuously manage growth through the following:<br /> <br /> • Continuously meeting or exceeding customers' expectations for product quality and performance<br /> <br /> • Timely delivery that meets customers' requirements<br /> <br /> • Continual improvement of procedures, processes, systems and machinery<br /> <br /> • Ongoing training of its teams abilities and culture.<br /> <br /> For more information contact:<br /> Dave Reiter, Partner<br /> A to Z Machine Co.<br /> 2701 E. Winslow Ave.<br /> Appleton, WI54911<br /> 920-993-0640<br /> dreiter@atozmachine.com<br /> www.atozmachine.com<br /> <br /> Paul Mandelbaum<br /> Lucas Precision<br /> 13020 St. Clair Ave.<br /> Cleveland, OH 44108<br /> 216-451-5588<br /> paulm@lucasprecision.com<br /> fermat.sales@lucasprecision.com<br /> www.lucasprecision.com<br /> <br /> Petra Mrkvova,<br /> Export Department<br /> Fermat Machinery<br /> Prumyslova 11<br /> 102 19 Prague 10<br /> Czech Republic<br /> Cell: 011-420-773-690-135<br /> petra.mrkvova<br /> @fermatmachinery.com<br /> www.fermatmachinery.com

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