ANGE January 2010 : Page 50

THE RADAR | DESIGN HIGH-RISING Architect Michael Maltzan at the just-completed, Guggenheim-esque New Carver project, which provides permanent housing for the homeless. Skid Glow! From deluxe Hollywood homes to housing for downtown’s homeless, architect MichaelMaltzan high-designs it all | ByMarissa Gluck | Photography by Spencer Lowell | Drive along the 10 Freeway near the 110 interchange and you’ll see a blindingly white building right next to the on-ramp. Flashes of bright yellow, injected into the building’s sawtooth pattern, jut out from corners and crevices. Inside is a courtyard with vertical metal “fi ns” running along the interior walls to provide privacy. T e six-story structure could easily signal the newest luxury condos to rise downtown. But these apartments are permanent housing for the homeless. Built by the nonprofi t Skid Row Housing Trust (SRHT), the 97-unit New Carver Apartments, opened in December, are the creation of acclaimed Silver Lake-based architect Michael Maltzan, whose practice bridges the chasm between L.A.’s most distressed corners and its priciest real estate. For Michael Ovitz, he’s just fi nished a modern house/art gallery that progresses as a series of cleverly connected, box-like spaces. Near downtown, he’s brought to life the smartly contained campus of Inner-City Arts, which brings arts education to more than 10,000 at-risk children a year. InBeverly 50 | Angeleno | January 2010 Hills, noted art collectors Alan Hergott and Curtis Shepard live in a blue-zinc-paneled Maltzan house, while 89 homeless men and women enjoy his fi rst project for SRHT, the red-and-white Rainbow Apartments, located near the bustling Old Bank District. T e 50-year-old Maltzan brings his unique vision to each project, regardless of client. He says his designs all “come from a similar interest in thinking about these places in contemporary ways.” In rapidly gentrifying downtown, there’s a clear advantage to hiring an architect of Maltzan’s caliber. His work is living proof that low-income housing, when imbued with high design, can stand as a proud part of downtown’s real estate comeback, rather than be a hindrance to it. “He goes beyond NIMBYism,” says SRHT executive director Mike Alvidrez. “He is promoting something, not Maltzan—who lives in Pasadena with his just battling something.” Adds Beth Tishler, the former executive director at Inner-City Arts: “Michael’s vision is that architecture lives and breathes in any community, regardless of race and class.” wife, Amy Murphy, vice dean of USC’s school of architecture, and their two children—next embarks on downtown’s $150 million, four- acre One Santa Fe project. Due to break ground in mid-2010, it will feature 440 rental units and 75,000 square feet of retail. But it’s the architect’s commitment to socially conscious projects (a mix of for-hire and pro bono work) that sets him apart. “Seeing a community developing before your eyes... does aff ect you, profoundly,” he says. With L.A.’s homeless population estimated at 43,000, there’s an urgency to the work done by architects like Maltzan who also excel as urbanists. In an economy where development is stalling (or stopping altogether), Maltzan continues to break conventions. “Change is written into the DNA of this city. It’s consistently one of the most exciting things about L.A.” A

The City Design

Marissa Gluck

Skid Glow!<br /> <br /> From deluxe Hollywood homes to housing for downtowns homeless, architect Michael Maltzan high-designs it all<br /> <br /> Drive along the 10 Freeway near the 110 interchange and youll see a blindingly white building right next to the on-ramp. Flashes of bright yellow, injected into the buildings sawtooth pattern, jut out from corners and crevices. Inside is a courtyard with vertical metal fi ns running along the interior walls to provide privacy.<br /> <br /> e six-story structure could easily signal the newest luxury condos to rise downtown.<br /> <br /> But these apartments are permanent housing for the homeless. Built by the nonprofi t Skid Row Housing Trust (SRHT), the 97-unit New Carver Apartments, opened in December, are the creation of acclaimed Silver Lake-based architect Michael Maltzan, whose practice bridges the chasm between L.A.s most distressed corners and its priciest real estate.<br /> <br /> For Michael Ovitz, hes just fi nished a modern house/art gallery that progresses as a series of cleverly connected, box-like spaces. Near downtown, hes brought to life the smartly contained campus of Inner-City Arts, which brings arts education to more than 10,000 at-risk children a year. In Beverly Hills, noted art collectors Alan Hergott and Curtis Shepard live in a blue-zinc-paneled Maltzan house, while 89 homeless men and women enjoy his fi rst project for SRHT, the red-and-white Rainbow Apartments, located near the bustling Old Bank District.<br /> <br /> e 50-year-old Maltzan brings his unique vision to each project, regardless of client.<br /> <br /> He says his designs all come from a similar interest in thinking about these places in contemporary ways. In rapidly gentrifying downtown, theres a clear advantage to hiring an architect of Maltzans caliber. His work is living proof that low-income housing, when imbued with high design, can stand as a proud part of downtowns real estate comeback, rather than be a hindrance to it. He goes beyond NIMBYism, says SRHT executive director Mike Alvidrez. He is promoting something, not just battling something. Adds Beth Tishler, the former executive director at Inner-City Arts: Michaels vision is that architecture lives and breathes in any community, regardless of race and class. Maltzanwho lives in Pasadena with his wife, Amy Murphy, vice dean of USCs school of architecture, and their two childrennext embarks on downtowns $150 million, fouracre One Santa Fe project. Due to break ground in mid-2010, it will feature 440 rental units and 75,000 square feet of retail. But its the architects commitment to socially conscious projects (a mix of for-hire and pro bono work) that sets him apart. Seeing a community developing before your eyes... does aff ect you, profoundly, he says. With L.A.s homeless population estimated at 43,000, theres an urgency to the work done by architects like Maltzan who also excel as urbanists. In an economy where development is stalling (or stopping altogether), Maltzan continues to break conventions. Change is written into the DNA of this city. Its consistently one of the most exciting things about L.A.

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
 

Loading